Guest Blog Post-September Fawkes

Today I’m welcoming September Fawkes as a Guest Blogger. Her website is chock full of fantastic writing tips. I highly recommend utilizing her insights as a resource. The advice she offers below is something I’ve found particularly helpful in my writing, though I know I’ve not even scratched the surface or come close to mastering subtext.

First, a little bit about September Fawkes:

September Fawkes

September Fawkes

Sometimes September C. Fawkes scares people with her enthusiasm for writing and reading. People may say she needs to get a social life. It’d be easier if her fictional one wasn’t so interesting. September C. Fawkes graduated with an English degree with honors from Dixie State University, where she was the managing editor of The Southern Quill literary journal and had the pleasure of writing her thesis on Harry Potter. Today she works for a New York Times best-selling author, is penning a novel, and sharing writing tips on her blog, which you can find at www.SeptemberCFawkes.com

Be sure to check out a Giveaway September is doing at the link below!

Take it away September…

Guest Blog Post-September Fawkes

Subtext: *tries to be invisible*

I’ve been seeing a number of stories lately that are lacking in subtext. And honestly, it’s no surprise. writing subtext (or, I guess not writing it) is flipping difficult to 1) understand 2) do. I had read about writing subtext like over two years ago, and only now do I feel like I’m starting to understand it and have conscious control over it. So, I’m going to attempt to try to explain how to do it.

What is Subtext?

The best definition of subtext, in my opinion, is this: subtext is what’s not said; it is what is implied.
Remember my humor post from a few weeks back? I talked about how Lemony Snicket had a specific technique he employed for some of his humor. He states the obvious. And then strongly implies the un-obvious.
So subtext is what is implied. Look at this example of it that I just made up:

Robert, not bothering to raise his hand, spouted out an inappropriate joke.

“Robert, I don’t want to hear that kind of language in my class,” Mr. Henderson said, but the ends of his lips twitched up. “That’s very offensive.” He failed to suppress a full-blown grin.

Here, we can tell that the teacher found whatever Robert said funny, but neither he nor the narrator comes out and tells the reader that. Instead it’s implied by his body language and behavior–what he doesn’t say. What Mr. Henderson actually says to Robert is at odds with how Mr. Henderson acts.

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Full Speed Ahead for Nanowrimo

Nanowrimo

Or, National Novel Writing Month for the uninitiated.

I’ve had a great 5 days of writing on my latest project so far. For various life reasons, my writing habit faltered during the early fall months, but I was able to plan and outline to reboot during November. Thus far, I’m very pleased with my success. My word count’s been great every day and I’m enjoying the story that’s forming around my outline. Feels kind of like Dr. Frankenstein bringing a creation to life. Muahaha!

The working title for my latest venture is Pendulum Arcanum. Here’s the Synopsis:

Pendulum ArcanumPendulum Arcanum, a Middle-Grade novel, is Warehouse 13 meets The Mummy.  Daniel Waldera believes Death stalks him every year when school starts. As 8th Grade begins, Daniel is relieved he no longer has to contend with his shadowy stalker from the past. After a terrible 13th birthday, Death once again lurks around every corner for Daniel until Halloween night when Daniel learns the truth behind his annual Back-to-School-Ghost.

Upon learning he has gained the ability to infuse everyday objects with magic, crafting powerful and sometimes dangerous artifacts, Daniel embarks upon a frightening adventure chased by horrifying spectres known as Drats threatening his friendships, family, and most importantly the entire school! In the end, Daniel discovers he has to make a terrible choice forever changing his life and the lives of those he cares about most.